Simple, frugal desert living at Rancho Costa Nada

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" Rancho Costa Nada: The Dirt Cheap Desert Homestead"

One of the top ten survivalist books, sez Amazon

You probably don't want to do this, but...

Here's how to live on almost nothing after quitting the job, the commute hassle, the mean boss, the nagging worries about rent and mortgage.  You buy worthless desert land and build a cheap shack on it.

Amazon says that "Rancho Costa Nada: The Dirt Cheap Desert Homestead," has become one of the top ten survivalist books.   Okay.  But the author isn't a survivalist or prepper.  He was just looking to avoid a regular job and other normal responsibilities and accomplishments, and instead have a life of careless leisure, without enduring hardship or conflict with the authorities.  Originally Rancho was published by the lamented Loompanics, a catalog publisher of quirky books that went bust and sold Rancho rights to Paladin Press, another alternative publisher. 

Rancho can be found in the aether, by googling Amazon, or Smashwords Garlington.  You can get a copy for your Kindle, Nook, Sony, iPad or any of the other platforms. 

Or. You can have the book for free, right here, by clicking the button above labeled, "Rancho Full Monty."  Or.  I'll send you a PDF copy, no charge:  >philgarlington@yahoo.com<  I don't need your money.

I've also posted Rancho excerpts above.  Maybe that's all you need.  The book is amusing but the message simple:  You're probably not going to want to do this, buy worthless dirt for almost nothing and put up a shack or trailer.  But you could.  It doesn't take a bank account or homesteader skills.  There's no hardship, except it can get boring for some people to live alone in the desert.

The e-reader version doesn't have pix, but a lot of them are on this site in the photo sections.

Worthless acres

"Rancho Costa Nada" tells how the author bought 10 worthless acres in the California desert for three hundred bucks. For another hundred, he built a comfortable little hogan out of scrap lumber and sand bags. Some ideas he figured out for himself, such as how to be his own utility district. Other schemes for frugal desert living came from half a dozen fellow homesteaders in the shimmering waste of the Smoke Tree Valley in Imperial County, California.

The author is no pioneer. Just an average mope without any particular survival skills or homesteader attributes such as carpentry or auto mechanics. But he found that by using a few simple expedients it's easy to live for almost nothing. No hardship. The cash he generates (and how hard is it to turn a few bucks in Samland?) becomes disposable income. So he travels during the summer inferno and uses the Rancho as home base in winter (unless he's housesitting or on the road).

What's in this peculiar book?

A description of building a tight little weather-proof hogan out of scrap lumber and sand bags. The hogan is surrounded by a wind break that forms a patio, covered by a shade ramada. Very plain, but strong enough (because of the sand bags) to withstand desert "box car winds" that can hit 80 mph.  In later years, he hauled in a junk travel trailer, gutted the inside, and made it into a living room. 

A personal utility district based on his car's alternator. You drive the car. Why not use it to pump up deep-cycle batteries strapped to the floorboards. A very simple method to generate enough electricity to operate lights, fans, radio, DVD, and water pump.

What about water? Drinking water has to be hauled from a public park in town, 45 miles away. Sixty gallons per week. The rest of the water comes from two sources. One of the other homesteaders, for a carton of cigarettes, will deliver up to 500 gallons of salty non-potable water from a secret well. Good enough for evap coolers, for gardening, and for a cool bath. The other source is from the wash. Homesteaders bury 55 gallon drums in the washes, which fill up during the brief flash floods.

I Get Around

Transportation. Some of homesteaders of the Smoke Tree are clever mechanics who have built Mad Max sand carts and dune buggies. Some of these vehicles are used to run the nearby gunnery range at night to salvage brass casings and aluminum tailfins. Trouble is, these vehicles, plus the big 4WD trucks the other homesteaders favor, slurp gas. The author has a small, gas-frugal car that he has equipped with winches and come-alongs that pop him out of the sand when he gets stuck in a wash.

Don't you need a refrigerator? The author gets along without one. Other homesteaders use propane fridges, but that's another expense. So is ice. He finds that he can get along for a week (the time between visits to the supermarket in town) without the expense of refrigeration. Let Albertsons pay for it. All the cooking is done on the two burners of a simple camp stove.

Sex?

It's like the water.  You go to town for it.

It Takes a Certain Type

The book also examines the lives of the half dozen other homesteaders in the Smoke Tree, mostly living in trailer compounds. Some are reclusive and don't wish society. Others are prickly, and easily riled, with packs of semi-feral dogs spotted round the laager on breakaway leashes. Others are frankly eccentric. But all of the inhabitants have figured out ingenious ways to cope with a harsh enviornment.

(Author's Note)  Here's an update. In the last few years a few things have changed. Now there's the travel trailer at the rancho, a gift from my brother-in-law, hauled out to my property over the 17 miles of washboard by the Demented Vet for the consideration of a tank of gas and a hamburger. Frankly, the trailer is much better than the hogan. It's off the ground, and easier to mouse-proof. The trailer has almost no amenities. The bilge pump I used for a home-made fountain got clogged with salt from the well water. All the cheapo 12-volt fans from SlaveMart crapped out, as did the ancient VCR. It's better this way. Now, the only electricity I use in the trailer powers the bedside reading lamp, the power source for which is one motorcycle battery and a small solar panel. The other illumination inside comes from a couple of beeswax candles (allegedly, less sooty). I have a flashlight for close work tracking stuff at night.

I do still have a computer from an earlier eon that I power off a marine battery in my car. The extra battery's charged off the alternator. I take the thumb drive from this computer to the library and fold it into my Yahoo account. I use the JC, the library, and the internet cafe for travel through the aether. I don't worry much about heat or cooling at the rancho, since when the weather gets too hot or cold I go someplace else. This last winter, I free-loaded with friends on the Big Island, and then went on a car camping safari down Baja, tenting on the beach. For a summer month, while the rancho is solarizing, I replenish the kitty by working the odd job. 

 

I've put a few other items on this site.  The one of possible interest to desert visitors is Chuckwalla Wire, the on-line version of the weekly newspaper, the Chuckwalla Reveille.

Chuckwalla Wire. The on-line edition of the Chuckwalla Reveille, the Voice of the Tri-Desert Empire. (Formerly the Jericho Clarion) Covering Chuckwalla, Blythe, Jericho, Sometimes Spring, Pele Verde, and all of Eastern Imperial County. Home of the Yellow Jackets. Go Jackets! Jacket Power! Headquarters of the Fifth Marines Desert Warfare Center. Gateway to the Mojave, Colorado, and Sonoran Deserts. Sunshine 300 Days a Year.

Chuckwalla Wire is the publication of record for the town of Chuckwalla.  The Wire features odd-ball columnists sharked up from among the locals.  Beet Baily, a campground hostess who lives year-around in a tent, writes about frugality. Diego Garcia writes from a prepper perspective.  Inadvertently and amusingly, news snippets in the Wire have chronicled the rise of Chuckwalla leading citizen Henry Pipps, a teen rough and city councilman who is also the top-ranking Boy Scout in town. The Wire also features somewhat notorious desert poet Orin Wimbly, an erstwhile high school English teacher before being fired for shocking students with a homemade electric chair.

This is on the button labeled "Chuckwalla Wire."

Low Tide at the Rancho. "ChuckwallaWire" is on a button above, but if you want a free PDF, mail me at >philgarlington@yahoo.com<

 

 What about copies of Tenting Today? 

There's been a trickle of interest. I don't expect more.  The book is flip about core values.  The slacker protagonist won't work or bear his weight.  Not a parasite on the state, but  parasite on his long-suffering dad.  Slacker Boy isn't one with the Sapitariat, despite being a Samlander born and trained for service.  He won't accept a seat at the bench, salute the logo, boost the economy, or lend a hand to make a better world.  Not glad to be of use.  He lets his blood wash in a campground with his haughty vegan girlfriend.  I've put the whole thing on a button.

I've also been sending comp e-copies to the curious handful.   It's not paper and ink, just a puff of air.   But my sister, the CPA, suggested that I put it up on the e-reader platforms.  You can see it on Smashwords, or on Kindle, Nook, Sony, or any of those.  I charge a couple of bucks, but if that's too rich I'll send a free PDF copy to an e-mail address.  I don't need money.  I keep my income at a certain level.

I'll send a copy if you go to philgarlington@yahoo.com.  The book's funny in parts.  But I admit the premise isn't promising.  Two recent college grads live in a tent in a public campground.  They won't work because that would involve subordination, and constraints on their leisure.  The anonymous protagonist and his girlfriend have taken a vow of failure, by Samland standards.  Nothing appeals about the cubicle, the last, or the seat by the oarlock.  

Chuckwalla Wire, the book.

Another slight thing, available on the same terms as above.  This is sort of the prequel to Rancho Costa Nada, the narrator's editorship of the Chuckwalla Reveille while subbing for the absentee publisher.  I've put it on one of the buttons above.  Little reaction so far, but I'll deal what there is.

 "It takes gall to make something so offensive."

Craig Whittens via e-mail

 

Only a handful of newspaper hacks are going to get this."

Jon DeLaps via e-mail

 

"Scurrilous, bigoted, inreverent, contemptuous, coarse.  Funny, sometimes."

Name withheld, via e-mail

 

The Sergeants are Revolting

Available on a button, as well as on Amazon,  Smashwords and the e-reader platforms, Revolt of the Sergeants.  Not your cup, probably.  Misanthropic.  Not much to like about the characters.  The stance is nihilistic.  The story comes from Dexter Dietz, owner and publisher of the Chuckwalla Reveille, who is now in a federal witness protection program.  A handful of retired lifer Army noncoms annex a basketcase province of Sudan to test managment ideas for subduing chaotic societies.  They are not mercenaries, because Darfur is a running sore of misery without trove or resource. Nor are they missionaries.  The methods are harsh.  Their strange enterprise can't succeed, but it works for awhile.  Not for the squeamish.

Going Pizza

After being fired by the corporate wights, I had to figure out revenue.  I means tested myself, and flunked.  One deal that kind of worked for awhile was the Hollywood option.  I wrote some spec screenplays.  Some got optioned, and while they never made the screen, I got a check.  Going Pizza is one of the spec plays that didn't get optioned, but I think it has comedic merit.  I've tacked it on to the About page until I get around to reworking it.

The long City Haul road.

City Haul is froth and spume that's been optioned twice, first by MGM, then by some mopes at ICM.  It's been the money maker because of some obvious cinematic potential.  The late Dick Shepherd, a producer at MGM, was ready to shoot, until the studio told him he had to choose between Haul and his other project, a David Bowie vampire vehicle.  Alas for me, but at least the Bowie thing was a flop.  Not that Shepherd's choice was any blow to culture.  Haul has the depth of a dinner plate.  Just amusing fizz.  In a word, a feckless, womanizing politican, abandoned at election time by his moneybags father-in-law, robs the city hall payroll with the help of his teenage aide, to finance a campaign that otherwise is hopeless.  I've put it on a button, and the e-reader platforms.

Duly Noted:

 Oh, oh.  No House

If you're in foreclosure and don't know what the heck to do, maybe visit Beet, at one of the tabs above.

My old pal Beatrice Baily, who lives in her tent the year through (shifting from Colorado to Arizona with the season) has a page of tips that might help the newly roof-less.  Beet enjoys tent life (I like it too, and stay under canvas some of the summer) and her rent-free life might inspirit the perspective of trembling prey animal facing foreclosure.  Maybe you really don't need a house.  Beet doesn't.  On this page, a picture of a Beet-like triple canopy all-season (if you live in California) tent home.

Tom Walker on Tents

 After returning from New York, where I checked out the Peasants' Revolt and the Occupy tent encampment, I called Tom Walker, another year around tent dweller, to get his jaundiced view.

"Amateurs," he said.  Walker and his wife Walks With Tom are among a handful of Humboldt County residents who live in tents full time.  I thought he might have some tips for the occupiers.

It turned out his wife won't let him go to any of the Occupy venues in person.  She says he's too excitable, and always thinks THIS is the protest that's going to crush the system and drive the exploiters to the wall.  He shouts slogans all day, waves the black flag, marches for miles, argues with the police.  Then he sits down in a public building, or breaks a few windows, and gets arrested.  Afterwards in sinks into a deep funk for a month, and Walks With Tom has to manage his meds.  She wouldn't let him go to Occupy, but he'd seen the tent encampment on tv.

"I should do a seminar," Walker said.  "They're clueless."

I'll summarize the Walker method for spending four comfortable seasons in a fabric house.  I use his idea myself, and can testify it works.  First, he doesn't like the refugee camp tent provided by the UN for Somalia and Kosovo.  It's made of single wall canvas and leaks.  The tent housing for guests in Yosemite Valley is a little better (if you don't contract hantavirus), because of a second roof stretched across the top.  Best, he says, is the triple canopy Chinese Box tent, a Walker innovation.

The trouble with tents in blustery wet weather is that no matter how careful one is about sealing the seams the tent will still leak in drenching rain.  It won't hold heat very well.  It's buffetted by the wind.  And then there's the condensation inside.  The answer is three tents of diminishing size, each inside the other.  Walker's own compound in Humboldt (he grows, so I can't say where) is an elaborate interlocking Christo-like running fence of tarp ramadas and canvas windbreaks.  But he started years ago with an austere Chinese box.

A sturdy ten-by-ten Sears tent is the main ingredient.  Inside that is a freestanding three-person backpacking tent that serves at the bedroom.  "It's an idea I got from the Inuit," he says.  "They put an igloo inside an ice cave." 

Over the Sears tent is one of those 12 by 12 canopies that are favorites at flea markets and street fairs.  And pinned around the canopy are heavy tarps as windbreaks."The layers provide insulation and prevent condensaton," Walker says.  In winter storms he uses a small catalytic heater, which means that the tents have to be well ventilated.  But Walker claims that for most of the winter he and Walks With Tom are comfortable inside with candles and sweaters.  He says that after a few years of full time tenting, the human thermostat resets and 55 becomes the new 70.  "I can't stand being in an overheated house," Walker says.

Now, Walker says, they usually sleep on a king sized bed under a huge black tarp.  It's rigged like a Bedouin tent with side panels that drop down for privacy or to block wind or sun.  They only use the Chinese Box  tent for storms or spells of frost.  "It's California, for Christ's sake," Walker says.  "Club Med." 

In summer, the black awning casts a deep pool of shade, while the open sides let in the breeze.  "It's all we need except when a cold front blows through."  A p;icture of the Walker design is on this page somewhere.
 

Other Walker tips:
A good mattress.  It's  not sleeping in a tent that's so bad; it's the hard ground.  A full length camp mattress on a cot is okay but better is a standard twin on a metal frame.  "A regular bed inside a tent," Walker says, "like at the dude ranch."

Warm bedding.  For those without allergies, that would be a goose down sleeping bag inside a Gore-Tex bivy.   Wool socks and a hot water bottle for the feet.  "Sometimes in the morning I use the heater to warm up the feet before I put on my boots," Walker says.  "Cold feet are a bummer."

I could hear Walks With Tom in the background telling him to get off the phone 

"And they should all wear loin clothes," Walker said quickly "Then they won't have to take off their pants when they change their underwear.  Sorry, pal.  I have to go."

The loin cloth idea isn't that crazy.  It's useful for budget train travel, when one bathes in the public john. 

 

 

Here's Chapter 1 of Rancho, to give you the flavor

Introduction

How desperation, joblessness, a flat wallet, and the sin of pride drove me into the desert like a pariah. And how I built a modest house for almost nothing and lived more or less comfortably.

I became a desert homesteader after I got fired from my last job. Homesteading in the burning waste is a new deal for me, but I’ve been canned many times. My deportment irks employers. It’s a kind of hauteur. A cocky, supercilious, cheeky insolence. An overweening querulous hubris. I repeat myself, too, and have a flashy vocabulary.

This time after getting sacked I started turning the idea that instead of donning somebody else’s livery again maybe I’d try my luck as a stalwart, self-sufficient modern pioneer who doesn’t need a regular job. I already owned some acres in a remote desert valley. That’s because, a couple of years before, while working as a reporter for a Southern California newspaper, I’d done a story about the annual tax-default land auction in rural Imperial County.

One of the parcels on the block was ten acres, way out in the dunes, with an opening bid of $100. I mean? To make it short, I chimed in, and after some desultory bidding I wound up getting the ten acres for $325.

A friend dubbed the property Rancho Costa Nada. It didn’t really cost nada, but it certainly didn’t cost mucha. The property lies in the middle of a monotonous baked-dry alkali basin that’s arid, scrub-covered, amenity-less and way the hell off the paved road.

Folks do live out there in the valley. True desert homesteaders, such as the Tewkes family, holed up in a laager of trailers in the hollow of a barren hillside, where the ingenious son and dad spend their days tinkering with an improvised fleet of Mad Max-style desert carts and buggies. There’s the irascible, touchy J.R., who finances his set of cannibalized sand rails by illegally salvaging brass casings from the nearby Chocolate Mountain Naval Aerial Gunnery Range.

Other settlers too, like the Hobo, and the Demented Vet. Baby Huey, Mystery Woman, and Alba the Dog Lady. Indian Phil used to live out there too but he’s in prison for shooting the finger off the deputy.

Admittedly, it seemed like madness for me to try homesteading. Nobody encouraged me. My sister said, “Is this some kind of religious deal? Are you going to be hawking tracts at the bus station? Because if that’s it, forget about coming to my house for Christmas.”

I’m a rugged survivalist only in theory. I have none of the practical skills of the Tewkes or J.R, or the Hobo. Some of the other inhabitants of the valley may be just as misanthropic, but they’re also handy and self-reliant. I’m more of a conceptualizer.

But I’m also a reader, and before I moseyed out to develop my scatter in the sun-basted beyond, I boned up on the desert pioneers, and visited all the websites catering to homesteaders, survivalists and back-to-the-land romantics. So I took with me a lot of intellectual hardware. In practice it turned out most of the cute ideas I lifted from books pretty much flopped.

Because of my limited tool-wielding abilities, my finished homestead is primitive, based on simple ideas that any mope can figure out without much need for luck or skill. Nor did my low-tech squat call for inordinate labor. I’m too lazy. And the real attraction: it was dirt cheap. It had to be, because when I went out to the Smoke Tree Valley I was busted.

For building, I used salvaged materials or stuff picked up from garage sales. No loans, no mortgage. No permit fees, since I didn’t pull any permits, and (as far as I know) it’s all legal.

Not many people are going to follow my example, buying worthless land for almost nothing at an auction, and then building a hogan and compound for a few hundred bucks out of scrounged material. My sister sees my “encampment” in the waterless Sahara as a nut deal suitable only for recluses and cranks that need a quiet place to make letter bombs. She says that my experiment in simple living is no high-minded Thoreau-vian examination of core values but rather the stigmata of a serious character flaw. That’s her.

Most other people, in saying why they wouldn’t be interested, cite a reluctance to suffer hardship. Rancho Costa Nada is innocent of alternating current, plumbing, tap water, and convenient shopping. Seventeen miles to pavement, 45 to a Kmart. I haven’t experienced any hardship. Pain, when I hit my thumb with the hammer. And often boredom. That’s why I travel. But nothing in the building or maintenance of the dirt-cheap homestead has been difficult. Any common mope can do it, as I’ve shown.

Understandably only a few adventurous freedom-seekers or surly malcontents actually will try this. The following chapters may appeal mostly to the fantasy life of city-bound wage serfs who dream of shucking the mindless job and the asshole boss, ditching their teeming fellow widgets and the nightmare commute, in favor of what might seem like (and for me, sort of is) a placid life of leisure and self-sufficiency.

 

These countless yoked minions of the world aren’t any handier than I am, and don’t have a big bank account either. But, see, it says here that it’s really possible to get land for practically nothing (as long as it has no water and is basically worthless) and then live on it in a comfortable little hogan, with a few cute, inventive but simple amenities, again for almost nothing. And no cretin taskmaster on your back harping about deadlines. The stuff of cubicle daydreams.

Let me run down some of the items I’ll be going over in the next pages.

Land. Mother Earth News likes to depict the woodsy homestead in the tall pines by a gurgling brook. Fact is, even the rawest land these days is pricey if it comes with water and timber. The only cheap land left in the States is worthless land. That means desert land. Bone-dry land.

So, what about water? A well is out of the question. It’s too expensive and the water’s usually salt when you hit it. Drinking water, at least, must be hauled from town. That’s what the homesteaders do, hundreds of gallons at a time. Out in my valley, J.R. may be willing to deliver some highly mineralized well water from his secret source that’s suitable for limited washing, for gardening, and for running the settler’s homemade evaporative coolers (provided the filters are cleaned every week).

Summer. Ouch. Typically, 110-120 degrees. When June rolls around I decamp like the wuss I am and go tenting in the mountains. Or sailing on San Francisco Bay. Most of the other homesteaders, hardier, and with more personal property to protect, ride it out. The Hobo, in an effort to keep cool, has buried his trailer in a deep pit. (He has a periscope he uses to watch the critters nosh at a feeding trough.) Most everybody else in summer uses various versions of home-made 12-volt swamp coolers. I tried one too, and also experimented with the heat chimney and the wind scoop.

Housing. A homesteader and auto mechanic named Cherokee (“an honest engine”) owns a sprawling junk ranch in the valley that other homesteaders pick over for building supplies. Across the river in Ehrenberg, Arizona, a guy named Wood Charlie sells salvaged lumber cheap. I built a simple cottage of sand bags and scrap lumber facing a courtyard patio covered with a shade-giving ramada. A south-facing solarium heats the sleeping room on cool days. I spent about $300, mostly for salvaged lumber and garage sale stuff, and for renting a truck to haul the stuff to the site.

I had to go bottom dollar because I was broke after getting broomed from my last job. It took me a week or so of puttering to build the sleeping hogan, and then I tacked on the rest, at a leisurely pace, over the next month. I did the work myself with ordinary hand tools. Most of the measuring was by eye ball. And I didn’t knock myself out.

 

(In this, the homely second edition, I’ll add notes gleaned from experience. I did too much at the Rancho. I worried too much about insulation. The cute solarium got shredded by the first boxcar wind. The insulation, the solarium, not needed. I never linger in the valley when it’s Siberia or the Sahara. I don’t need a shelter for all weathers. Wind-proof and shady. That’s what’s wanted. A junk trailer, gutted, refurbished and reinforced. Or a simple desert bum box, the plywood and two-by-four sleeping cube ubiquitous in the desert. Now, since I spend summer and winter traveling or tent camping, I do fine with just an ample shade ramada and the windbreak.)

 

Utilities. The Smoke Tree Valley, of course, is off the grid. No power poles. So I formed my own private utility. I keep a couple of deep cycle marine batteries on the floorboard of my car which I charge off the alternator while I’m driving around. At home I plug my car into the hogan, and have plenty of juice to run lights, TV, fans, fountains, air filter, computer. I have a small solar panel too, to run the kitchen light, but the trouble with solar generally is that it’s too complicated and expensive. It takes an electrical engineer to get it working right. Windmills, ditto, and also too delicate and noisy. I figure I’m gonna drive the car anyway. Might as well use it to pump up a couple of extra batteries.

Heat comes from a catalytic propane heater. The brand name is “Mr. Heater,” and everybody out here uses ‘em. The cost of utilities? A lot less than my former utility bill. The price of a couple of Kmart batteries and a tank of propane. Refrigeration? I let the supermarket handle it, although for awhile I had an evaporative cool box good enough to keep beer at pub temperature. Shower? A home-made deal. A big hand-pumped garden sprayer. I also have a bathtub I got from a salvage yard, but it needs too much water to be practical.

(Note. I’ve reduced the draw. I shut down the bilge pump fountain. More cute than practical. The SlaveMart fans crapped out and I didn’t replace them. I prefer print to video, and got an e-reader that has been a paradigm shift. A library in a tablet. LED lights now of course. A cell phone and a laptop. Everything binned in the Civic’s trunk, and powered from one deep cycle marine battery.)

 

The Life. Mostly one of leisure. After breakfast, I usually stroll for a few hours in the cool of the ante meridian. I’m an ambler, not a hiker. I like the desert, and I like to poke around in the seldom-visited canyons in the mountains near my place. Some regard the surroundings as kind of dun and sere, but I’ve come to enjoy the sweeping vista thing. When I return after a morning’s exploration, I lie on a cot in the shade of the courtyard ramada and read novels for while. After lunch, a siesta. In the afternoon I take care of any chore, putter around, plink at beer bottles with a .22 pistol, read some more, or go visiting. Maybe motor up the hill to listen to a jeremiad from the Demented Vet. After dinner, a cocktail while the lurid, gaudy sunset flames in the Western sky. I might watch one of the vintage DVDs I rent in town (five for five bucks). I enjoy this kind of languid repose for a couple of weeks. When I get restless I take a trip someplace, using all the dough I save by not paying rent.

Well, now for a closer look.

 

 

 

 Triple canopy all season 100 square-foot tent house.

 Inexpensive shelter, that's good enough for the four seasons in temperate California.  It's a square 10x10 tent inside a quick shade awning like the ones at the flea market.  The sides of the awning can be enclosed by tarps in times of wind and wet.  For cold weather, a smaller free standing tent goes inside the bigger tent to make a bedroom, an idea borrowed from the Inuit Indians, who build igloos inside ice caves.

 

During the year I'm in Northern California during the  summer and at the the Rancho, or Wiley Wells long-term campground near Blythe in Southern California, for the winter.  Sometimes during the shoulder seasons, I housesit..  Lately, because of the downtick, vacant houses everywhere, with the owners worried about vandalism.  I usually set up a tent, either inside the house, or this four-season version in the backyard.  When house sitting I can use an electric heater if needed; otherwise, propane Mr. Heater.  

Le Petit Canard

This is the name of the Cal-20 I got at the Boy Scout auction for $300.  It was built in 1973, has a full set of sails, but no motor.  It's berthed in the Sacramento Delta near Stockton.  Usually, I sail under the main alone, all I need in the frequently brisk winds.  In light airs, I raise a headsail that's self-tending, since working against the weather on the Delta rivers means a lot of short boards.  Both the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers are tidal, of course, so a little patience and a willingness to move at night can place you in a current going your way.  Or, in my case, I generally just go whichever way the current happens to be flowing.  I usually use the boat during the Indian Summer months, perfect weather in the Delta.